Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Should the NHL take their fans' loyalty for granted?


As the NHL lockout nears the three month mark, hockey fans’ attention and dollars have been turning elsewhere. NFL and NBA – the two sports that are playing – are drawing increased attention, while hockey fans’ apathy has been rising towards the league.

Yet the NHL doesn’t seem concerned. Gary Bettman has repeatedly called hockey fans “the best fans in the world” and the league’s opinion clearly seems to be that no matter how badly the fans get mistreated, they’ll come crawling back, eager to throw their money at the league once more.

Should the NHL instead be … worried?

In a fan survey conducted by HockeyBroad.com at the start of the lockout and again last week, results indicated:
  • 78.5% of the respondents said they had been hockey fans at least 5 years; 58% said they had been fans for 16 years or more;
  • 86.2% of the respondents go to 2 or more NHL games per year;
  • 65.7% of the respondents spend $26 or more per NHL game in addition to ticket costs.

Despite these figures, 50.3% of all respondents said they currently have zero money currently tied up in the NHL, and the number of fans proactively cancelling single game or season tickets is on the rise. The number of fans who feel they’ll keep attending NHL games “no matter what” is dropping; and the longer the lockout runs, the more likely fans are to start cancelling existing tickets/ticket plans and to spend less and less money on merchandise.

One of the old school rules of marketing is the “80/20 rule", otherwise known as the Pareto Principle. What it means for business is that 80% of your sales or repeat business comes from 20% of your customers: the fans, the die-hards, the people who are dedicated to and invested in your brand. If you alienate that 20%, you need to court new customers and build new relationships to replace them: a costly, time-consuming part of business.

A lot of fans have begun attending games for junior leagues and finding they can get their “hockey fix” there, and much less expensively than the NHL. At the AHL level, you can buy a pair of on- or near-glass seats, plus parking and even some beer, for the same cost as a single seat in the 300s at the NHL level. You can attend a game in many of the junior leagues than it costs to attend a movie.

The most telling number as we head into the holiday season is that NHL fans are increasingly less willing to spend money on the NHL – the easiest and most impactful way to get the attention of the league, by hitting the bottom line.

Half the fans aren’t putting any money into tickets, but over 70% also aren’t spending money on jerseys and other league memorabilia, choosing to lock the league out of their wallets. In today's rough economy, fans are even welcoming the fact they're not spending the money on hockey, allowing them to have a little more in the bank for bills or holiday spending.

All of this will ultimately impact the NHL’s bottom line when they resume play – and it follows that the salary cap will be directly impacted, no matter how the new CBA is crafted.

Remember how the Blackhawks had to dismantle their Cup-winning team immediately after their Cup win? The cap is currently set at $70.2M for 2012-13; six teams have under $5M of cap space currently. (Over half the league has $9.2M or less cap space.) With reduced revenues this year – even if they’re prorated for a full season, and an adjustment period is built into the new CBA – means that teams like the Bruins, Wild, and Canucks – all within $2.5M of the current cap – could possibly be scrambling to rebuild their rosters in 2013-14.

It gives one of Shop.NHL.com’s ads from last year an interesting new perspective:



In the ad, a Red Wings chair is repeatedly turned away from NHL fan homes, until it finds the home that’s “just right”. In the middle of the lockout, the ad could be viewed as the league trying to still appeal to fans, but getting turned away.

Have you ever wondered why corporate juggernauts like McDonald’s, Coke, Pepsi, L’Oreal, etc., spend so much on advertising, when they are already well-established brands leading their industries? It’s because customers are fickle and easily forget – yes, even the big brands.

Perhaps you haven’t consciously thought about it, but when a product is constantly in front of you, you think about that product, and you want it, you crave it. An ad comes on your TV and suddenly you have an urge to run to the store.

Right now, the NHL isn’t really in front of anybody. It has become a fleeting footnote on newscasts across North America, because there is rarely anything fresh to report. No game scores. No hot rivalries in town. No trades, no injury reports, nothing.

Every so often, it pulls at our interest, with discussion of talks that raise fans’ hopes fleetingly, before allowing them to crash back into apathy and increasing disinterest.

Instead of building on the excitement and glory of the 2011-2012 season, the league has instead chosen to make it clear that the relationship wasn’t good enough; they want more. The NHL took all the momentum of the past five years and punched it in the face like a team enforcer, but not for reasons that the fans can cheer onward.

They’re counting on the fans to come surging back – after a reasonable period of post-lockout pouting, of course.

The truth is that the NHL will be facing an uphill battle, no matter how soon they return.

If they make a deal this week, it could mean that the season could start before Christmas. The love and good cheer of the season might help salve fans’ feelings towards the NHL – but the league shouldn’t bank on it. The longer the lockout drags on, the more fan apathy builds, and the easier it is for fans to take their time and money and look elsewhere for their entertainment.

* * * * *

 NHL Lockout - Fan Survey Responses

A total of 190 responses were evenly split between the first survey when the lockout started, and the second survey, 10 weeks later. For statistical purposes, the demographic stats have less than 4% variance between the two surveys.

STH = Season Ticket Holder (may refer to quarter, half, or full season packages


1. How long have you been a hockey fan? (Including leagues other than the NHL)

Less than 1 year
1.1%
1-3 years
9.9%
3-5 years
10.5%
5-10 years
10.5%
10-15 years
9.9%
16+ years
58.0%

2. How many NHL games do you normally attend per year? (NON-playoffs)

0-1 games
13.8%
2-3 games
25.4%
4-6 games
19.3%
7-8 games
6.6%
9-11 - single game tickets purchased
8.3%
9-11 - quarter season STH
3.3%
12-21 - single game tickets purchased
5.0%
12-21 - quarter season STH + single game tickets
5.0%
12-21 - half season STH
1.7%
22-41 - single game tickets purchased
0.0%
22-41 - half or quarter season STH + single game tickets
1.7%
22-41 - full season STH
3.3%
41+ - attend not only home games but road games as well
6.6%

3. Not including your ticket costs --- how much *on average* would you say you spend per game attended? (Parking/transit; food/drink; game programs; 50-50s; souvenirs)

Under $5
3.3%
$6-15
9.4%
$16-25
21.5%
$26-50
30.9%
$51+
34.8%

4. How much money do you currently have tied up in NHL tickets and related expenses? (including single tickets, ticket plans, and spent events such as the Winter Classic and All-Star Game; plus parking passes, hotel & flight reservations, etc.)

None
50.3%
Under $100
5.0%
$101-250
6.6%
$251-500
6.1%
$501-750
6.1%
$751-1,000
2.8%
$1,001-1,500
6.6%
$1,501-$3,000
7.7%
$3,001-$5,000
3.9%
$5,001+
4.4%

5. What percentage of your post-tax income/take-home pay is either currently tied up in NHL tickets & related expenses (hockey-related travel reservations, parking passes, etc) -- OR -- do you normally spend per year to watch NHL hockey live? (whichever is higher) Answer for your annual income bracket (row) only; round up or down to nearest full %. (Easiest way to compute this is to take the amount you spend on hockey & divide it by your annual take-home pay; the result is your percent. e.g., if you spend $500/yr on hockey and take home $20K: the result is 0.025, 2.5%)


<1%
1-3%
4-6%
7-9%
10-12%
13-15%
16-20%
21%+
$19K or less
14.4%
10.5%
1.1%
0.6%
3.3%
0.6%
0.6%
0.6%
$20-25K
5.0%
3.3%
1.7%
0.6%
2.2%
--
--
--
$26-35K
6.6%
3.3%
1.1%
0.6%
0.6%
--
--
--
$36-45K
3.9%
2.8%
2.2%
1.1%
1.1%
--
--
--
$46-60K
4.4%
3.3%
3.3%
--
--
--
--
--
$61K+
15.5%
8.3%
2.8%
4.4%
0.6%
--
--
--

6. For your money currently tied up in NHL single-game tickets and/or ticket plans, what is your current plan of action as the lockout rolls on?

Keep money in acct/apply to future purchases
9/15
12/1
Single games
14
12
Quarter/half/full season ticket holders
16
12
Winter Classic
5
2
All-Star Game
4
2
Refunds on game-by-game basis as cancelled *
Single games
28
26
Quarter/half/full season ticket holders
11
8
Winter Classic
7
4
All-Star Game * Note: ASG tickets were refunded once the game was cancelled.
6
4
Cancelling/have cancelled tickets/STHs
Single games
1
10
Quarter/half/full season ticket holders
2
5
Winter Classic
-
4
All-Star Game
-
2

7. How much of the season would the NHL have to cancel for you to be "done" with the league?


9/11
12/1
I will keep buying tickets no matter what
27.6%
21.3%
Pre-season lockout was enough for me to be done
2.3%
3.2%
25% - cancelling STHs but will buy single games
-
-
25% - not buying more
6.9%
6.4%
50% - cancelling STHs but will buy single games
2.3%
4.3%
50% - not buying more
3.4%
9.6%
75% - cancelling STHs but will buy single games
-
2.1%
75% - not buying more
1.1%
1.1%
Full season - cancelling STHs but will buy single games
-
3.2%
Full season - not buying more
4.6%
10.6%
Uncertain at this time
51.7%
38.3%

8. Whether or not you attend NHL games, do you attend any other hockey games?


9/11
12/1
No / attend NHL only
17.2%
11.7%
AHL - single game tickets
55.2%
54.3%
AHL - partial season ticket plan holder
2.3%
6.4%
AHL - full season plan holder
2.3%
2.1%
ECHL - single game tickets
23.0%
14.9%
ECHL - partial season ticket plan holder
1.1%
1.1%
ECHL - full season plan holder
1.1%
1.1%
OHL / WHL / QMJHL - single game tickets
10.3%
14.9%
OHL / WHL / QMJHL - partial season ticket plan holder
-
-
OHL / WHL / QMJHL - full season plan holder
1.1%
-
USHL / CHL - single game tickets
11.5%
8.5%
USHL / CHL - partial season ticket plan holder
-
-
USHL / CHL - full season plan holder
-
-
Other league - single-game tickets *
-
23.4%
Other league - partial season ticket plan *
-
1.1%
Other league - full season plan holder *
-
4.3%

* "Other league" choices were not on Sept survey. Added to 12/1 survey by respondent requests

9. Aside from currently not being able to attend games, are you personally otherwise affected by the lockout for any of the following reasons?

Work at a hockey arena and have had hours cut
2
Work near a hockey arena and have had hours or income affected (parking, waitstaff, bartender, souvenir shop, etc)
3
Work near a hockey arena and have been laid off / not yet re-hired for season (parking, waitstaff, bartender, souvenir shop, etc)
1

10. I am protesting the NHL lockout by ....

9/11
12/1
Not buying any NHL merchandise until play resumes
59.8%
71.3%
Not buying any tickets until play resumes
50.6%
46.8%
Boycotting other products/companies owned by NHL owners
29.9%
21.3%
Unfollowed the NHL on Twitter, Facebook, etc
21.8%
35.1%
Emailed a complaint to the NHL or filed one via NHL.com
19.5%
14.9%
Cancelling single-game tickets
17.2%
17.0%
Contacted local / favorite team to file a complaint
5.7%
8.5%
Phoned the NHL offices to file a complaint
4.6%
4.3%
Cancelling quarter/partial season tickets
2.3%
4.3%
Cancelling half-season tickets
1.1%
1.2%
Cancelling full season ticket package
1.1%
-
Cancelling my Winter Classic tickets
-
4.3%
Cancelling my All-Star Game tickets
-
1.2%

Saturday, November 24, 2012

How to make the most money out of your charity game



So, you’ve lined up anywhere from two dozen players up to two full teams to come play for your charity game. The building is sold out, and you know auctioning off a few jerseys will pad the night’s total even higher.

But is it the most you can do to create the biggest fundraising?

Let’s talk about hockey fans and their mentality as consumers for a moment here.  As a demographic, hockey fans make the highest average salary among sports fans, and this is easily reflected both in the prices they pay for tickets, and for how much fans will pony up for hockey-related gear. For example, NHL jerseys start around $125 just for replicas and $300 for authentic.

Fans drop plenty of money on game night, even if they’re already well-stocked with memorabilia at home. And hockey fans are generous when it comes to charity; always have been, undoubtedly always will be.

What other options can be used for fundraising at a charity game?




50/50 & CHUCK-A-PUCK

The most obvious is a long-time staple at hockey games: the 50/50 raffle pot. We’ll discuss more about raffles when discussing jerseys, but this one is a no-brainer.

Chuck-a-puck is a mainstay at ECHL, AHL, and other minor league hockey games. People buy pucks, 1 for $1 or 6 for $5, and there's either one big prize to be one (signed jersey, for example) or one big prize and a couple secondary prizes, depending on what the sponsors have donated on any given night. If you've ever witnessed chuck-a-puck, you know this is another very way to rake in some easy money.


MYSTERY PUCKS

Pucks are a favored collectible among hockey fans; they’re small enough to be easily stored once purchased, and it’s easy to build up a sizable collection.

The absolute easiest possible way to rake in some funds hand-over-fist for your charity event is “mystery pucks”, a long-beloved tradition on fundraising nights around every level of hockey league out there. Depending on the level of the event, mystery pucks may go for anywhere from $10-30 each, or more.

Even if there’s not time (or funds/sponsors) to get event-personalized pucks, buy a bunch of blank pucks – average cost for blank pucks is around $1/puck; even less if bought in larger quantities. (Personalized pucks cost around $2/each if bought in quantities of 300+ and usually need a week for turnaround/delivery.)

Have every player who's in the game sign 20 pucks (make sure they include some sort of notation to signify the event, if the pucks are not customized already); wrap the pucks up in plain wrapping paper – use two separate colors to identify which team each signee is playing for. 

Sell them for $20 each – if you have a minimum of 15 players per team, that’s an easy $12K+ for your event!

The bonus for fans here is that you know whatever puck you get is a "good puck". 


SILICONE BRACELETS AND T-SHIRTS

You see them everywhere: silicone bracelets, all kinds of colors, for every event. Bought in bulk, they can average 33¢ or less (depending on quantity) and can be sold for $5 or $10. An easy, inexpensive souvenir from your game; but time factor may be prohibitive to cost depending on how much lead time there is. Also, not as large of a return on investment as a fundraiser as mystery pucks; but also easy to sell via eBay or something online before/after your event.

The main inhibiting factor about special event T-shirts is cost and return (i.e., trying to offer a spread of sizes and possibly being left with inventory). The cost-effective way for T-shirts to be offered is to only offer a single size and keep quantities limited. However, even if T-shirts are not sold, making them up for volunteer staff and/or to toss a couple dozen into your crowd creates a unique souvenir.


AUTOGRAPHS FOR DONATIONS

Another “no-brainer”, where people could donate either what they want or a pre-specified amount in order to get an autograph from players, either before or after the event game.


SILENT AUCTIONS

If you have unique items to offer, such as framed pictures, game- or practice-used sticks, etc., silent auctions are definitely one way to go. 


PAY-PER-VIEW

If your game is studded with enough stars/is a big enough event, and there's enough lead-in time, consider getting your event onto PPV, even if it's just internet PPV. For fans, plenty would consider the cost of a movie ($10) worth tuning in for, and you could get a lot more viewers/tickets sold for the event.

If the concern is not selling out the actual game in-building, that's why you put it on PPV instead of free TV - people still pay to see it, and you'll attract viewers from across the state or country.


JERSEYS

Ah, yes, the jerseys. Any charity event is a special one-time deal and the most obvious special item is jerseys.

Obviously, it’s worth being able to offer VIP packages where fans get seats on the glass and their own jersey; even better if they get to meet players from the game, and to get those jerseys signed.

A prime item for fundraising at your charity game is of course selling off the game-worn jerseys. While the temptation is to go the easy and obvious route of silent auctions – or even live auction post-game – why not put them up for raffle?

Say you have 30 players and the average jersey auctions for $400 (this is figuring some players will bring in less than others); that’s about $12K.

Let’s think about sports fans here for a moment. Hockey fans love owning game- (or practice-) worn/used jerseys and sticks. The majority of fans – as badly as they might want a game-worn item – are not going to be the ones bidding at silent auctions. If you’ve ever walked by a silent auction table, there’s usually a handful of bids; if it’s a really popular player or rare item, the bid list might stretch to a full page worth.

But let’s say you could buy raffle tickets 1 for $5, 3 for $10, 7 for $20. A lot more fans have the “you can’t win if you don’t play” mentality and are willing to risk $5, $10, or even $20 for a shot at winning a game-worn jersey – especially if the proceeds are going to charity. The thought is, “Ok, even if I pay for $20 worth of tickets and I don’t win, the money is going to a good cause.” 

In talking with a couple fans at a recent charity game, and asking about jersey raffles vs. silent auctions, the feedback was, “Not only would I put up at least $20 for raffle tickets, there’s a pretty good chance that once I got a beer or two in me, I’d be going back for more tickets.” 

And at charity events, people do go back, time and again, to get “just a few more” raffle tickets. It appeals to the little gambler inside all of us... if our chances are good enough, we might win that highly-prized, unique jersey. For special, one-off events, the appeal is even greater.

So, let’s say the average fan was dropping $20 on raffle tickets – it would only take selling tickets to 600 people to make as much money as silent auctioning them off at $400 apiece – and chances are solid that many more people would spend more than that.

Alternatively, the top three players from each team - that is, the "star" players whose jerseys could be expected to fetch $1K or more - could be available via silent or post-game live auction while all other player jerseys are available through raffles.

* * *

Granted, any charity event is 100% reliant on volunteer efforts to get things set up, and the time frame leading up to your event. 

However, armed with the knowledge of how hockey fans spend, combined with the best choice(s) of options to suit the time frame you have ahead of you, you can create the best fundraising possible for your charitable cause.

* * *

Thank you to ALL the players who have been out there participating in a variety of charity games during the lockout. Your participation has created some impressive fundraising for many great causes across North America. /Sticktaps to all of you, the event organizers and sponsors, and the volunteers, for these fun events.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Non-NHL hockey team directory: North America

The NHL CBA quietly expired on Saturday night, and with it, the NHL went into its second lockout in under 10 years. The last time the League had a lockout, it lost an entire season.

So in a week where hockey fans should be eagerly heading to watch NHL training camps, and hockey writers discussing what changes their teams made over the summer, and the experts putting together team forecasts and fantasy rankings ... the league has fallen dark.

But despite fans bemoaning that there's "no hockey" to watch, there is in fact plenty of hockey - if you know where to look. Here is your state-by-state and Canadian province-by-province breakdown of the top junior, collegiate, and semi-pro leagues in North America.

---------

LEAGUES 

  • AHL games can be watched online via AHL Live; fees may apply; (Microsoft Silverlight required). International broadcast restrictions may apply for online broadcasts.

  • ECHL games can be watched online via America One Sports; fees may apply; Adobe Flash and ONE Vision plugin required.
  • ECHL radio broadcast links can be accessed via team pages or the ECHL website. International broadcast restrictions may apply for online broadcasts.

CHL - Central Hockey League - website - twitter - phone apps
  • CHL games can be watched online via CHL-TV; fees may apply; (Microsoft Silverlight required). International broadcast restrictions may apply for online broadcasts.

CWHL - Canadian Women's Hockey League - website - twitter

NAHL - North American Hockey League - website - twitter - video
  • Game broadcasts can be found on FastHockey; fees may apply. International broadcast restrictions may apply for online broadcasts.

OHL - Ontario Hockey League - website - twitter
  • Radio and TV broadcast information is on the OHL website; games can be watched via OHL Live. OHL Live has a season pass for $290; a single-team pass for $180; single-team/away game only $100; single games are $6.99, 5-game pack $29.99; 10-game pack $54.99. International broadcast restrictions may apply for online broadcasts.

QMJHL - Québec Major Jrs. Hockey League- website - twitter - league videos

USHL - U.S. Hockey League - website - twitter - video

WHL - Western Hockey League - website - twitter - phone apps

Some college games can be watched online via America One Sports; fees may apply; Adobe Flash and ONE Vision plugin required. Keep an eye on NBC Sports Network as some college games will be aired live this season. Check individual college websites for online radio/TV feed availability. There are many more collegiate hockey programs than are listed here; check with your favorite college/university team website for further information.


---------

U.S. STATE/CITYTEAMTWITTERLEAGUE
ALABAMA
HuntsvilleUniversity of Alabama-College
ALASKA
AnchorageAlaska Aces@AlaskaAcesECHL
FairbanksFairbanks Ice DogsNAHL
Kenai River (Anchorage)Kenai River Brown Bears@BrownBearsNAHLNAHL
ARIZONA
Prescott ValleyArizona Sundogs@ArizonaSundogsCHL
Tempe (Phoenix)Arizona State@ASUD1Hockeycollege
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
BakersfieldBakersfield Condors@CondorsECHL
FresnoFresno Monsters@FresnoMonsters1NAHL
Ontario (LA/Orange County)Ontario Reign@ontarioreignECHL
San FranciscoSan Francisco Bulls@SFBullsECHL
Stockton Stockton Thunder@StocktonThunderECHL
COLORADO
Colorado SpringsColorado Collegecollege
DenverDenver Cutthroats@DEN_CutthroatsCHL
DenverUniversity of Denvercollege
Windsor (Ft. Collins)Colorado Eagles@ColoradoEaglesECHL
CONNECTICUT
BridgeportBridgeport Sound Tigers@TheSoundTigersAHL
HamdenQuinnipiac Universitycollege
HartfordConnecticut Whale@CTWhaleAHL
New HavenYale University@YaleAthleticscollege
Stafford SpringsUniversity of Connecticut@UConnMHOCcollege
DELAWARE
FLORIDA
Estero (Ft. Myers)Florida Everblades@FL_EverbladesECHL
OrlandoOrlando Solar Bears@OrlandoHockeyECHL
GEORGIA
Duluth (Atlanta)Gwinnett Gladiators@gwtgladiatorsECHL
HAWAII
IDAHO
BoiseIdaho Steelheads@steelheadsECHL
ILLINOIS
Bensenville (Chicago)Chicago Steel@ChicagoSteelUSHL
BloomingtonBloomington Blaze@BLMBlazeCHL
ChicagoChicago Wolves@Chicago_WolvesAHL
MolineQuad City Mallards@myqcmallardsCHL
PeoriaPeoria Rivermen@Peoria_RivermenAHL
RockfordRockford IceHogs@goicehogsAHL
SpringfieldSpringfield Jr. Blues@Jr_BluesNAHL
INDIANA
EvansvilleEvansville IceMen@EvvIceMenECHL
Ft. WayneFt. Wayne Komets@FWKometsECHL
IndianapolisIndiana Ice@indianaiceUSHL
Notre DameUniversity of Notre Dame-college
IOWA
Cedar RapidsCedar Rapids RoughRiders@RidertownUSAUSHL
DubuqueDubuque Fighting Saints@Fighting_SaintsUSHL
Sioux CitySioux City Musketeers@MusketeerhockeyUSHL
Urbandale (Des Moines)Des Moines Buccaneers@bucshockeyUSHL
WaterlooWaterloo Black Hawks@BlckHawksHockeyUSHL
KANSAS
Topeka RoadRunnersTopeka RoadRunners@TopekaHockeyNAHL
WichitaWichita Thunder@Wichita_ThunderCHL
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
Orono (Bangor)University of Maine@maineicehockeyCollege
PortlandPortland Pirates@portlandpiratesAHL
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
BostonBoston BladesCWHL
BostonBoston College@BCHockeyNewsCollege
BostonBoston University@BUAthleticsCollege
BostonNortheastern University@GoNUwhockeyCollege
Cambridge (Boston)Harvard University@harvardcrimsonCollege
LowellUniversity of Massachusetts@Ulowell_hockeyCollege
SpringfieldSpringfield Falcons@TheFalconsAHLAHL
WorcesterWorcester Sharks@WorcesterSharksAHL
MICHIGAN
Ann ArborUniversity of Michigan@umichhockeyCollege
Ann ArborUS Hockey Nat'l Development Program@USNTDPUSHL
Big Rapids (Grand Rapids)Ferris State@ferrishockeyCollege
FlintMichigan Warriors@MichWarriorsNAHL
Grand RapidsGrand Rapids Griffins@griffinshockeyAHL
KalamazooKalamazoo Jr. K-Wings-NAHL
KalamazooKalamazoo Wings@KalamazooWingsECHL
KalamazooWestern Michigan University@bodnarwmuCollege
MuskegonMuskegon Lumberjacks@MuskegonJacksUSHL
Plymouth Township (Detroit)Plymouth Whalers@PwhalersOHL
Port HuronPort Huron Fighting Falcons@PHhockeyNAHLNAHL
SaginawSaginaw Spirit@SaginawSpiritOHL
Sault Ste. MarieSoo Eagles@GoSooEaglesNAHL
MINNESOTA
AustinAustin Bruins@theaustinbruinsNAHL
DuluthUniversity of Minnesota @UMDBulldogsCollege
Minneapolis-St. PaulUniversity of Minnesota @GopherHockeyCollege
St. CloudSt. Cloud State@stcloudstateCollege
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
IndependenceMissouri Mavericks@MissouriMavsCHL
St. CharlesSt. Charles Chill (starts play 2013-14)-CHL
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
KearneyTri-City Storm@TriCityStormUSHL
LincolnLincoln Stars@LincolnStarsUSHL
OmahaOmaha Lancers@OmahaLancersUSHL
NEVADA
Las VegasLas Vegas Wranglers@WranglersLVECHL
NEW HAMPSHIRE
DartmouthDartmouth@Dartmouth_MIHCollege
DurhamUniversity of New Hampshire@UNHHockeyCollege
ManchesterManchester Monarchs@MonarchsHockeyAHL
NEW JERSEY
AlbanyAlbany Devils@albany devilsAHL
PrincetonPrinceton University@puhockeyCollege
TrentonTrenton Titans@TtitansECHL
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
BinghamtonBinghamton Senators@Bsens_HockeyAHL
CantonSt. Lawrence@SLUsaintsCollege
ElmiraElmira Jackals@JackalsHockeyECHL
Glens Falls (Saratoga Springs)Adirondack Phantoms@phantomshockeyAHL
IthacaCornell Univerity@CornellHockeyCollege
JamestownJamestown Ironmen@nahlironmenNAHL
PotsdamClarkson@CUKnightsCollege
RochesterRochester Americans@AmerksHockeyAHL
RochesterRochester Institute of Technology@RITMHLiveCollege
SchenectadyUnion@unionhockeyCollege
SyracuseSyracuse Crunch@syracusecrunchAHL
Troy (Albany)Rensselaer Polytechnic (RPI)@RPIhockeydotnetCollege
NORTH CAROLINA
CharlotteCharlotte Checkers@CheckersHockeyAHL
NORTH DAKOTA
BismarckBismarck Bobcats@BismarckBobcatsNAHL
FargoFargo Force@FargoForceUSHL
Grand ForksUniversity of North Dakota@UNDMHockeyCollege
Minot Minot Minotauros@MinotauroHockeyNAHL
OHIO
Bowling GreenBowling Green State University@BGSU_HockeyCollege
CincinnatiCincinnati Cyclones@CincyCyclonesECHL
ClevelandLake Erie Monsters@monstershockeyAHL
OxfordMiami University (Ohio)@MiamiIceHockeyCollege
ToledoToledo Walleye@ToledoWalleyeECHL
YoungstownYoungstown Phantoms@YtownPhantomsUSHL
OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma CityOklahoma City Barons@OKC_BaronsAHL
TulsaTulsa Oilers@tulsa_oilersCHL
OREGON
PortlandPortland Winterhawks-WHL
PENNSYLANIA
ErieErie Otters@ErieOttersOHL
HersheyHershey Bears@TheHersheyBearsAHL
JohnstownJohnstown Tomahawks@johnstownhawksNAHL
Moon Township (Pittsburgh)Robert Morris U. Colonials @RMUHockeyCollege
PittsburghUniversity of Pittsburgh-College
ReadingReading Royals@RRoyalsHockeyECHL
Wilkes-Barre/ScrantonWilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins@WBSPenguinsAHL
RHODE ISLAND
ProvidenceBrown University@BrownAthleticsCollege
ProvidenceProvidence Bruins@AHLBruinsAHL
ProvidenceProvidence College@FriarsHockeyCollege
SOUTH CAROLINA
GreenvilleGreenville Road Warriors@GvlRoadWarriorsECHL
North CharlestonSouth Carolina Stingrays@SCStingraysECHL
SOUTH DAKOTA
AberdeenAberdeen Wings@AberdeenWingsNAHL
BrookingsBrookings Blizzard@Blizzard_hockeyNAHL
Rapid CityRapid City Rush@RapidCityRushCHL
Sioux FallsSioux Falls Stampede@sfstampedeUSHL
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
Allen (Dallas)Allen Americans@allenamericansCHL
AmarilloAmarillo Bulls@AmarilloBullsNAHL
Cedar Park (Austin)Texas Stars@TexasStarsAHL
College Station Texas A&M@tamuicehockeyCollege
Corpus ChristiCorpus Christi IceRays@goiceraysNAHL
Frisco (Dallas)Texas Tornado@Texas__TornadoNAHL
HoustonHouston Aeros@Houston_AerosAHL
N. Richland Hills (Ft. Worth)Texas Brahmas@TexasBrahmasCHL
OdessaOdessa Jackalopes@LetsGoJacksNAHL
San AntonioSan Antonio Rampage@SARampageAHL
Wichita FallsWichita Falls Wildcats@WFWildcatsNAHL
UTAH
West Valley City (Salt Lake City)Utah Grizzlies@UtahGrizzECHL
VERMONT
BurlingtonUniversity of Vermont@UVMmhockeyCollege
VIRGINIA
NorfolkNorfolk Admirals@NorfolkAdmiralsAHL
WASHINGTON
Everett (Seattle)Everett Silvertips@WHLSilvertipsWHL
Kenniwick (Walla Walla)Tri-City Americans@TCAmericansWHL
Kent (seattle) Seattle Thunderbirds@SeattleTbirdsWHL
SpokaneSpokane Chiefs@chiefshockeyWHL
Wenatchee Wenatchee Wild@WenatcheeWildNAHL
WEST VIRGINIA
Wheeling (Pittsburgh)Wheeling Nailers@WheelingNailersECHL
WISCONSIN
Green BayGreen Bay Gamblers@GamblersHockeyUSHL
JanesvilleJanesville Jets@JanesvilleJETS1NAHL
MadisonUniversity of Wisconsin@badgermhockeyCollege
MilwaukeeMilwaukee Admirals@mkeadmiralsAHL
Onalaska (La Crosse)Coulee Region Chill@CRChillNAHL
WYOMING
CANADA - PROVINCETEAMTWITTERLEAGUE
ALBERTA
CalgaryCalgary Hitmen@WHLHitmenWHL
Calgary/EdmontonTeam Alberta@AlbertaCHWLCWHL
EdmontonEdmonton Oil Kings@EdmOilKingsWHL
LethbridgeLethbridge Hurricanes@WHLHurricanesWHL
Medicine HatMedicine Hat Tigers@tigershockeyWHL
Red DeerRed Deer Rebels@rebelshockeyWHL
BRITISH COLUMBIA
AbbotsfordAbbotsford Heat@abbotsfordheatAHL
CranbrookKootenay Ice@WHLKootenayICEWHL
KamloopsKamloops Blazers@blazerhockeyWHL
KelownaKelowna Rockets@Kelowna_rocketsWHL
Prince GeorgePrince George Cougars@PGCougarsWHL
VancouverVancouver Giants@WHLGiantsWHL
VictoriaVictoria Royals@victoriaroyalsWHL
MANITOBA
BrandonBrandon Wheat Kings@bdnwheatkingsWHL
NEW BRUNSWICK
BathurstTitan Acadie-Bathurst@ABTitanQMJHL
MonctonMoncton Wildcats@monctonwildcatsQMJHL
Saint JohnSt. John Sea Dogs@SeaDogsHockeyQMJHL
NEWFOUNDLAND
St. John'sSt. John's IceCaps@IceCapsAHLAHL
N.W. TERRITORIES
NOVA SCOTIA
HalifaxHalifax Mooseheads@HFXMooseheadsQMJHL
SydneyCape Breton Screaming Eagles@CBSEHockeyQMJHL
NUNAVUT
ONTARIO
BarrieBarrie Colts@OHLBarrieColtsOHL
BellevilleBelleville Bulls@OHLBullsOHL
BramptonBrampton Battalion@OHLBattalionOHL
BramptonBrampton HC@BramptonCWHLCWHL
GuelphGuelph Storm@Storm_CityOHL
HamiltonHamilton Bulldogs@BulldogsAHLAHL
KingstonKingston Frontenacs@KingstonFrontsOHL
KitchenerKitchener Rangers@OHLRangersOHL
LondonLondon Knights@GoLondonKnightsOHL
MississaugaMississauga Steelheads@OHLSteelheadsOHL
OshawaOshawa Generals@Oshawa_GeneralsOHL
OttawaOttawa 67's@Ottawa67shockeyOHL
Owen SoundOwen Sound Attack@AttackOHLOHL
PeterboroughPeterborough Petes@PetesOHLhockeyOHL
St. Catherine'sNiagara IceDogs@OHLIceDogsOHL
SarniaSarnia Sting@StingHockeyOHL
SudburySudbury Wolves@Sudbury_WolvesOHL
TorontoToronto Furies@TorontoCWHLCWHL
TorontoToronto Marlies@TorontoMarliesAHL
WindsorWindsor Spitfires@Go_Spits_GoOHL
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
CharlottetownP.E.I. Rocket@peirockethockeyQMJHL
QUEBEC
Baie-ComeauDrakkar Baie-Cómeau-QMJHL
BoisbriandBlainville-Boisbriand Drakkar-QMJHL
DrummondvilleVoltigeurs Drummondville@voltiavieQMJHL
ChicoutimiSaquenéens Chicoutimi-QMJHL
GatineauOlympiques Gatineau@LesOlympiquesQMJHL
MontréalStars de Montréal@MontrealCWHLCWHL
QuébecQuébec Remparts@quebec_rampartsQMJHL
RimouskiOcéanic Rimouski@oceanicrimouskiQMJHL
Rouyn-NorandaRouyn-Noranda Huskies-QMJHL
ShawiniganCataractes Shawinigan-QMJHL
SherbrookeSherbrooke Phoenix-QMJHL
Val-d'OrForeurs Val-d'Or@LesForeursQMJHL
VictoriavilleVictoriaville Tigers@TigresVictoQMJHL
SASKATCHEWAN
Moose JawMoose Jaw Warriors@MJWarriorsWHL
Prince AlbertPrince Albert Raiders@PARaidersHockeyWHL
ReginaRegina Pats@WHLPatsWHL
SaskatoonSaskatoon Blades@bladeshockeyWHL
Swift CurrentSwift Current Broncos@SCBroncosWHL